Difference between revisions of "Terminal"

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A '''terminal''' is a device attached to a computer which allows a [[user]] to interact with the computer by typing information in on a [[keyboard]], and receiving back information which the [[software]] on the computer sends to it.
 
A '''terminal''' is a device attached to a computer which allows a [[user]] to interact with the computer by typing information in on a [[keyboard]], and receiving back information which the [[software]] on the computer sends to it.
  
Initially, all terminals were [[printing terminal]]s, such as [[Teletype]]s. Later, [[video terminal]]s mostly replaced them, since they were faster, and had other advantages (they didn't use paper, most of which contained output which was not worth retaining).
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Initially, all terminals were [[printing terminal]]s, such as [[Teletype]]s. Later, [[video terminal]]s mostly replaced them, since they were faster, and had other advantages (e.g. they didn't use paper, most of which contained output which was not worth retaining).
  
 
These terminals were generally connected to the computer via an [[asynchronous serial line]] - perhaps remotely, via a [[modem]].
 
These terminals were generally connected to the computer via an [[asynchronous serial line]] - perhaps remotely, via a [[modem]].
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In modern [[personal computer]]s, the terminal functionality is generally integrated into the computer, using a [[bit-mapped display]] for output.
 
In modern [[personal computer]]s, the terminal functionality is generally integrated into the computer, using a [[bit-mapped display]] for output.
  
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Latest revision as of 22:11, 20 October 2018

A terminal is a device attached to a computer which allows a user to interact with the computer by typing information in on a keyboard, and receiving back information which the software on the computer sends to it.

Initially, all terminals were printing terminals, such as Teletypes. Later, video terminals mostly replaced them, since they were faster, and had other advantages (e.g. they didn't use paper, most of which contained output which was not worth retaining).

These terminals were generally connected to the computer via an asynchronous serial line - perhaps remotely, via a modem.

In modern personal computers, the terminal functionality is generally integrated into the computer, using a bit-mapped display for output.