Difference between revisions of "VM/370"

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[[Image:Vm370.jpg|150px|right|VM/370]]
 
[[Image:Vm370.jpg|150px|right|VM/370]]
VM/370 was the first OS on the [[S/370]] mainframe platform that facilitated the creation of Virtual machines. This was a VERY popular OS for people to load onto their mainframes as now they wouldn't have to choose which OS to load, for applications as they could now load ALL of them.
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'''VM/370''' was the first [[operating system]] on the [[IBM System/370]] [[mainframe]] platform that supported [[virtual machine]]s. This was a VERY popular OS for people to load onto their mainframes as now they wouldn't have to choose which OS to load for applications, as they could now load ALL of them.
  
 
== Documentation sets ==
 
== Documentation sets ==
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There has been regular updates to what is currently known as the '[http://vm370.31bits.net/beta/ six pack]'.
 
There has been regular updates to what is currently known as the '[http://vm370.31bits.net/beta/ six pack]'.
  
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[[Category:Operating Systems]]
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[[Category: IBM Operating Systems]]

Latest revision as of 03:33, 17 December 2018

VM/370

VM/370 was the first operating system on the IBM System/370 mainframe platform that supported virtual machines. This was a VERY popular OS for people to load onto their mainframes as now they wouldn't have to choose which OS to load for applications, as they could now load ALL of them.

Documentation sets

Bitsavers has a few manuals online. They can be found here:

Getting this to run

Thankfully the software is available, although I've found a few 'issues' with the install process and I've outlayed a tested one here: Installing VM/370 on Hercules

31bits and beyond

There has been a movement to expand the 370 virtual machine to incorporate 31bit addressing of the 390, allowing larger program sizes. Primarily this has been to allow gcc to self host under MVS.

There has been regular updates to what is currently known as the 'six pack'.