Difference between revisions of "UNIX"

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'''Unix''' (officially trademarked as '''UNIX'''® - the documentation switched from using 'UNIX' to 'Unix' as of V7) is a computer [[operating system]] originally developed in the 1970s by a group of AT&T employees at Bell Labs including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie and Douglas McIlroy.
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'''Unix''' (officially trademarked as '''UNIX'''® - the documentation switched from using 'UNIX' to 'Unix' as of [[Unix Seventh Edition|V7]]) is a computer [[operating system]] originally developed in the 1970s by a group of AT&T employees at Bell Labs including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie and Douglas McIlroy.
  
 
Today's Unix systems are split into various branches, developed over time by AT&T as well as various commercial vendors and non-profit organizations. A number of clones of Unix, which share the interfaces, and 'look and feel', but no code, have also been produced.
 
Today's Unix systems are split into various branches, developed over time by AT&T as well as various commercial vendors and non-profit organizations. A number of clones of Unix, which share the interfaces, and 'look and feel', but no code, have also been produced.

Latest revision as of 16:24, 20 December 2020


UNIX
Type: Time-sharing
Creator: Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie and Douglas McIlroy at Bell Labs
Multitasking: Multi-tasking with swapping/paging (latter added in a later version)
Architecture: Originally PDP-7, then PDP-11; now cross-platform.
Date Released: 1969


Unix (officially trademarked as UNIX® - the documentation switched from using 'UNIX' to 'Unix' as of V7) is a computer operating system originally developed in the 1970s by a group of AT&T employees at Bell Labs including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie and Douglas McIlroy.

Today's Unix systems are split into various branches, developed over time by AT&T as well as various commercial vendors and non-profit organizations. A number of clones of Unix, which share the interfaces, and 'look and feel', but no code, have also been produced.

Versions of relevance for hobbyists include:

  • Unix System 1 - The first version of UNIX that has been recently made to run on the PDP-11
  • UNIX V5 - One of first version with known source and binaries available.
  • UNIX V6 - The last version before branches started to appear
  • Unix V7 - One of the most complete and the last generally available and PDP-11 version of Research UNIX
  • Unix/32V - A 32bit port of System 7 to the VAX 11/780.

Unix then went commercial and was sold. Below is an early ad for AT&T UNIX.

Unix ad

CSRG releases

Meanwhile the CSRG kept on releasing newer BSD UNIX's derived from 32v. Descended from there are several popular versions:

  • FreeBSD focuses on providing a system geared towards a single user.
  • NetBSD will run on a variety of 32-bit older systems from the VAX to the Amiga.
  • OpenBSD derived from the NetBSD project will run on all kinds of systems.

See also